Using Apologetics

 Taken from the apologist Dan Story’s book on

“Defending Your Faith”

 

This is a semi-long article and a very good article but it might be good not to start it until you have time and can concentrate.

Let  us begin.

  1. Christian apologists must identify the real problem with the individual becoming of believing in God, Jesus and Christianity and respond accordingly. We may find that there is no real problem but simply the inaction of the person to get involved with wanting to learn about Christianity. Sometimes we may have to deal with peripheral concerns or non-apologetics matters before we can discover the real obstacle to faith.

Those with their minds already made up will not consider improving themselves  and must be left to their thoughts. All we can do is to pray for their change of heart and mindset.

To the people with intellectual obstacles, we apply apologetics. It’s crucial that we identify whatever the obstacle is that stands between an unbeliever and faith in Jesus Christ and then apply apologetics giving every reason for the non-believer to understand  who he should believe in, what he should believe and why he should believe only in God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit and Christianity.

Never Give People a Problem

We should never force apologetics on someone or create illegitimate reasons to use it. Studying apologetics can be so affirming to one’s faith that it frequently leads to a new zeal for evangelism. I hope it does for you. The impulse is to go out and confront everyone you know and challenge their misbeliefs (especially people who may have tripped you up in the past).

However, remember rule number one: “gospel first, apologetics second.” Apologetics is a tool for evangelism, not an excuse to argue. It’s a means to an end (the gospel)—not the end itself.

Christian love and understanding may be all some people need. Again, the rule here is, whenever possible, give the gospel first. Let the unbeliever raise objections. Apologetics is a tool for evangelism, not for winning arguments.

  1. Find out what the real problem(s) are. Again, the rule here is, whenever possible, begin with the gospel first. Let the unbeliever raise objections. Apologetics is a tool for evangelism, not for winning arguments.

Whatever the issues, Christian apologists must identify them and respond accordingly. Sometimes we may have to deal with peripheral concerns or non-apologetics matters before we can discover the real obstacle to faith.

Objections to Christianity fall into one of three categories: (1) emotional, (2) willful, or (3)intellectual. Emotion issues, such as anger at God or a bad experience with church or an individual Christian, are not solved through apologetics. People with these problems need to have personal friendships with mature, committed Christians. They need to experience Christian love and observe Christian faith in action.

What about people who willfully reject Christianity in spite of our best efforts at proclaiming gospel, law, or apologetics? the people with intellectual obstacles, we apply apologetics. If we fail to identify their real issues and respond only to the peripheral ones or apply the wrong approach (such as sharing the gospel with someone who needs apologetics—see chap. 1), we will never convince unbelievers that Christianity is true. It’s crucial that we identify whatever the obstacle is that stands between an unbeliever and faith in Jesus Christ.

  1. Avoid Distractions – Lifestyle

Unless unbelievers make it an issue themselves, don’t get distracted by their lifestyles. Apologetics deals with intellectual obstacles, not moral issues. That a man and woman are living together out of wedlock should not prevent us from sharing Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior. Nor should we let it interfere with a discussion of apologetics.

I was discussing this particular point in class when one of my students raised her hand and said, “I have a relative who is a homosexual. Every time I witness to him, we eventually come to this issue, and I just can’t get beyond it. What do I do?”

The answer is to go around it. God will deal with moral issues once a person sees his or her need to become a Christian. It is the Holy Spirit who convicts people of sin (John 16:8). He will show unbelievers those areas in their lives that need to be changed—and then empower them to make the necessary changes—once He calls them into the family of Christ.

Sanctification is a process that begins after we’re saved—it’s not a requirement before we’re saved. A past life of sin is not an obstacle to faith, but our condemnation and our threats of divine punishment can be. Jesus came to heal the sick (sinners) not the healthy (Mark 2:17). We would not need Christ if we weren’t sinners.

  1. Peripheral Issues

The second distraction to avoid is peripheral issues—issues that are not apologetic in nature or do not further the cause of evangelism. Some unbelievers like to argue just for the sake of arguing and are unwilling to examine critically the decisive issues: Who is Jesus Christ? Is salvation only through Him? Is the Bible true? These people characteristically interrupt, change the subject, or wander off on rabbit trails.

A favorite tactic of these unbelievers is to argue over some inane matter that has nothing to do with whether Christianity is true or not, such as the death penalty. Christians involved in cult evangelism frequently encounter this ploy. In order to avoid discussing relevant issues, many cultists prefer to argue over soul sleep, blood atonement, or some other irrelevant dogma.

How do we respond to these individuals? By controlling the conversation. Keep them on track by constantly returning to the issue at hand. Try to move the conversation to “Who is Jesus Christ?” Point out that you are willing to listen to them, but they in turn must give you the same respectful attention, or there is no use continuing the discussion. Insist that they let you respond to one issue before they raise another one. Again, control the conversation.

  1. Apply Evangelistic and Missionary Techniques

This means two things. First, as said before, the ultimate goal of apologetics is evangelistic. The purpose is to bring people as quickly and as efficiently as possible to the point where they renounce their non-Christian worldviews and accept Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior. In this sense, apologetics is “pre-evangelism.”

Second, like all missionary work, apologetics involves seeking unbelievers on their own turf. In Romans 10:14–15 Paul writes:

How can they hear without someone exhorting or preaching to them? And how can they preach unless they are sent? As it is written, “How beautiful are the feet of those who bring good news!”

And in Romans 15:20–21 he adds:  It has always been my ambition to preach the gospel where Christ was not known, so that I would not be building on someone else’s foundation. Rather, as it is written: “Those who were not told about him will see, and those who have not heard will understand.”

Paul reminds us in these two passages, Romans 15: 20-21, that (1) unbelievers must hear and receive the gospel before they can be saved, and (2) Christian evangelists (and apologists) should seek “new territory.”

It’s up to Christians to bring unbelievers saving knowledge of Jesus Christ, wherever they are. Paul was willing to conform to Jewish ritual in order to witness to the Jews, as long as it didn’t compromise the gospel or violate biblical principles. Likewise, we too can be apologetic missionaries. Our neighborhoods, workplaces, and social clubs are fertile missionary fields. We can invite unbelievers to church, home Bible studies, and into our homes.

  1. Know What You Believe (Defensive Apologetics)

This is defensive apologetics. It entails being prepared to answer the challenges and objections unbelievers raise. The Lord has charged us with the responsibility to evangelize the lost (Acts 1:8) and to defend our faith (1 Peter 3:15; Jude 3). In order to do this, we must be able to do three things:

  • First, we must understand and be able to explain orthodox biblical doctrines, especially the essentials of our faith.
  • Second, we must be able to demonstrate these doctrines from Scripture and back up what we believe in the Bible. This requires systematically studying the Bible.
  • Third, we must be able to defend Christian truth-claims and present rational and verifiable apologetics
  1. Know What Unbelievers Believe (Offensive Apologetics)

Whereas defensive apologetics is defending Christianity, offensive apologetics is challenging the unbelievers’ beliefs. For now, it needs to be seen that offensive apologetics requires an understanding of what unbelievers believe.

Christian apologists must learn what unbelievers believe. This is especially necessary for apologists witnessing to people of non-Christian religions and Christian cults. It’s impossible to formulate  offensive apologetics unless we understand what these religions teach.

The lesson here is be prepared. Do your homework. Learn what you can about the religions and the secular worldviews you are likely to encounter at home, work, school, and play.

  1. 8. Don’t Be Intimidated

Most non-Christians have little knowledge of the Bible, and few have read even a portion of it. They seldom ask sophisticated questions or need in-depth answers. In fact, it’s best to keep our responses as simple and specific as possible.

In many cases, unbelievers are so ignorant of Christianity that they have a hard time even articulating their arguments, let alone offering any evidence for their beliefs. For example, when a non-Christian claims that the Bible is “full of contradictions,” he is seldom able, when asked, to point to one such contradiction. He probably never studied the Bible and got his opinions from hearsay: “Everyone knows.“

This is not to say that there are no astute non-Christians with sophisticated arguments. But most of the people Christians encounter are friends, relatives, coworkers, fellow students, and neighbors. Their criticisms are usually the product of anti-Christian sentiments absorbed from the media, TV and movies, secular colleges and high schools, and so on. Seldom are their criticisms well-thought-out arguments.

If you do encounter questions you can’t answer, or arguments you can’t refute, admit it. Our response to all challenges must be honest. However, not having a response at the moment is not the same as saying that there is no response. Point this out. Assure the unbeliever that there is an answer to his question or argument and that you will find it. This provides an opportunity to meet again.

  1. If you do encounter questions you can’t answer, or arguments you can’t refute, admit it. Our response to all challenges must be honest. However, not having a response at the moment is not the same as saying that there is no response. Point this out. Assure the unbeliever that there is an answer to his question or argument and that you will find it. This provides an opportunity to meet again.

The lesson here is that being discourteous or rude does not create an environment that encourages the work of the Holy Spirit. Be polite and respectful as any Christian should be when sharing with unbelievers. That’s how we’re supposed to behave.

Apologetics is giving a reasoned defense of Christian truth-claims, in particular of the authenticity of the Bible and the deity and resurrection of Jesus Christ.

Christians have religious truth and the evidence to prove it. The problem is, no one likes to lose an argument. So good apologetics convinces without being offensive.

How do we “argue” so as not to make people lose face? The apostle Paul gives us the answer:

Be wise in the way you act toward outsiders; make the most of every opportunity. Let your conversation be always full of grace, seasoned with salt, so that you may know how to answer everyone. (Col. 4:5–6)

And the Lord’s servant must not quarrel; instead, he must be kind to everyone, able to teach, not resentful. Those who oppose him he must gently instruct, in the hope that God will grant them repentance leading them to a knowledge of the truth (2 Tim. 2:24–25).

By following this advice, Christians using apologetics will seem not only interested in sharing truth, but genuinely interested in the unbeliever as a person. This is the surest way to earn the right to share the gospel.

  1. The Foundational Issue — Defending the Bible

“Everything depends on whether or not the Bible is true.” It is the fundamental apologetic issue to which Christians must attend: Is the Bible reliable? This, above all other matters, must be substantiated.

Why is this? Because Christianity stands or falls on the merits of scriptural veracity. All Christian truth-claims, including the deity and resurrection of Jesus Christ, depend on the truthfulness of Holy Scripture.

Where do we learn precise information about the nature of God? The Bible. Where do we meet Jesus and learn what He has done for us? The Bible. Where do we learn how to be saved, how to grow spiritually, and how to become filled with the Holy Spirit? The Bible.

It’s the proven reliability (and hence the authority) of the Bible that elevates Christianity above all other religions.

  1. How Do We Know the Bible Is Reliable?

At this point it’s necessary to qualify what apologists mean when they claim they can prove the reliability and authenticity of the Bible. Obviously vast portions of Scripture, standing alone, are not provable: the existence of heaven and hell, the indwelling of the Holy Spirit, the existence of angels and demons, the virgin birth, and salvation through Christ are a few examples. These spiritual truth-claims are impossible to check out and to verify empirically.

However, it’s not necessary to prove any of these truths in order to establish the reliability and authority of Scripture. Let me explain.

Christian apologists can demonstrate that the Bible is truthful and reliable in every area that it is possible to investigate: through its historical, archeological, cultural, scientific, and geographical claims; its textual coherence and the accuracy of its transmission down through the ages; the precision with which its many hundreds of prophecies have been fulfilled; its accuracy in explaining human nature as we experience it; and its ability to meet people’s deepest emotional needs.

If the Bible stands the test of critical scrutiny in these areas, Christians are justified—we are being logically consistent—in concluding that the Bible is equally truthful and reliable in the spiritual (non-testable) arena as well. How do we know that angels exist and that salvation is through Jesus Christ alone? Because they are revealed in a book of proven accuracy and reliability. In other words, we can demonstrate that the Bible is divine revelation to the highest level of certainty attainable in the area of religious truth, to a probability far beyond any reasonable doubt.

How does this compare with other religious holy books? The fact is, no other religious book in existence meets these criteria. Indeed, all religious writings except the Bible are conspicuous in their lack of verification. The Bible, alone among the world’s holy books, is God’s written disclosure of spiritual and moral truth.

Inevitably, upon investigation and in spite of their claims, all other religious writings and philosophies can be demonstrated to have arisen from one or a combination of the following.

(A.)  The words and writings of false prophets who claim divine revelation and even historical verification, but who cannot demonstrate it. Their so-called revelations contain numerous unfulfilled prophecies and/or historical inaccuracies. Islam and many Christian cults, such as Mormonism and Jehovah’s Witnesses, fall into this category.

(B.)  The fanciful philosophical speculations of religious sages or gurus (known or unknown, dead or alive). Often their pronouncements are esoteric (“physical reality is an illusion”), violate the laws of logic (“there are many paths to God”), and contradict normal human experience (“people are innately divine”). In all cases, these claims are unverifiable. Examples include Eastern religions, Hinduism and Buddhism, and their numerous New Age clones.

(C.)  The wholly subjective opinions of self-appointed seers who don’t even try to verify their claims beyond private, often mystical, religious experiences: “God appeared to me and said …” “People are laughing uncontrollably and barking like dogs—the Holy Spirit is moving in a new and powerful way!” These so-called religious experiences have spawned numerous strange beliefs and weird behaviors that are beyond the bounds of orthodoxy. Although many claim to be Christian, none can be justified biblically.

  1. The Logic of It All

I want to put what we’ve been looking at in a syllogism. Doing this will help to make these important principles clear, and it will also show how to apply the facts in a systematic defense of apologetics. We saw the need to establish the divine authorship of Scripture:

Only God can write an infallible book. (premise 1)

The Bible is an infallible book. (premise 2)

Therefore, the Bible is the Word of God. (conclusion)

Premise 1 is essentially self-evident. No book written by a human is infallible. If an infallible book exists, only God could write it (inspire its authorship). Because no human being can submit an infallible book, few people will object to premise one. So we’ll focus on premise two: The Bible is an infallible book. Here’s where objections will occur. Most unbelievers will disagree with premise two. So our apologetic task is to muster evidence to support it. Once we verify premise two, the conclusion must follow: The Bible is the Word of God.

What evidence do we have to support premise 2? Here I must refer the reader to my book Defending Your Faith, or other introductory books on apologetics. Space prevents listing them here. What investigation will reveal, as pointed out above, is that the evidence supporting the truthfulness and reliability of Scripture is overwhelming. Premise 2 can easily be verified through the evidences of apologetics.

With the divine authorship of the Bible established, we have a basis for defending the authenticity of the Resurrection. The Resurrection, as Scripture makes clear, proves the deity of Jesus Christ. Hence, if the Bible is truthful, the Resurrection is a historical fact, and Jesus Christ is God. And if Jesus is God, then He speaks the truth of God concerning salvation and other issues. Here’s the argument in syllogistic form:

Only God can write an infallible book. (premise 1)

The Bible is an infallible book. (premise 2)

Therefore, the Bible is the Word of God. (conclusion)

Only God can raise someone from the dead. (premise 1)

The Bible states that Jesus raised Himself from the dead—John 2:19; 10:17–18. (premise 2)

Therefore, Jesus is God. (conclusion)

Jesus as God speaks only truth. (premise 1)

Jesus says people are saved only through Him. (premise 2)

Therefore, Jesus is the only Savior. (conclusion)

Notice the progression of this logical argument. It forms an apologetic method for proving all Christian truth-claims.

First, we demonstrate the reliability and truthfulness of Scripture, thus establishing the Bible’s authority as God’s Word.

Second, we demonstrate that the Bible clearly teaches that Jesus Christ is God. This is proven (among other ways) by His resurrection from the dead.

Third, since Jesus is God, He speaks the words of God. Although Jesus says many things vital to the human race, the most important thing He says is that salvation is only through Him (John 14:6; Acts 4:12).

What needs to be seen is that the last two syllogisms are true only if the first syllogism is true. And the first syllogism is true only if the Bible is true. Thus, the foundational task of apologetics is to prove the reliability and authenticity of the Bible.

Dr. Norman Geisler, in his apologetic textbook, Christian Apologetics, uses this method to demonstrate that Jesus is the Son of God:

The basic logic of the apologetic for Christianity is: (1) The New Testament is a historically reliable record of the life, teachings, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ …; (2) Jesus taught that he was God Incarnate …..(3) Jesus proved to be God Incarnate by fulfilling Old Testament prophecy, by a miraculous life, and by rising from the grave.….Therefore, Jesus of Nazareth who was raised to heaven by the Father  and sits at the Fathers right hand is Deity.

Likewise, R. C. Sproul, in his book Reason to Believe, uses a similar procedure to demonstrate the infallibility of Scripture:

The case for the infallibility of Scripture proceeds along both deductive and inductive lines. It moves from the premise of general trustworthiness to the conclusion of infallibility. The reasoning proceeds as follows:

Premise A—     The Bible is a reliable and trustworthy document.

Premise B—     On the basis of this reliable document we have sufficient evidence to believe confidently that Jesus Christ is the Son of God.

Premise C—     Jesus Christ, being the Son of God, is an infallible authority.

Premise D—     Jesus Christ teaches that the Bible is more than generally trustworthy; it is the very Word of God.

Premise E—     The word, in that it comes from God, is utterly trustworthy because God is utterly trustworthy.

Conclusion—     On the basis of the infallible authority of Jesus Christ, the church believes the Bible to be utterly trustworthy, i.e., infallible.

Although Montgomery, Geisler, and Sproul are dealing with somewhat different apologetic issues, you can see the similarities in their approaches. All three systems contain two essential ingredients.

First, they all employ logical argumentation to reach an inescapable conclusion. Second, all three base their systems of apologetics on the reliability and authenticity of Scripture. They recognize that a successful apologetic system depends on the authority of the Bible as God’s Word.

The authority of Scripture is not only the fundamental issue of apologetics, it’s also the premier point of contact leading to a gospel presentation.

With the divine authorship of the Bible established, we have a basis for defending the authenticity of the Resurrection. The Resurrection, as Scripture makes clear, proves the deity of Jesus Christ. Hence, if the Bible is truthful, the Resurrection is a historical fact, and Jesus Christ is God. And if Jesus is God, then He speaks the truth of God concerning salvation and other issues. Here’s the argument in syllogistic form:

Only God can write an infallible book. (premise 1)

The Bible is an infallible book. (premise 2)

Therefore, the Bible is the Word of God. (conclusion)

Only God can raise someone from the dead. (premise 1)

The Bible states that Jesus raised Himself from the dead—John 2:19; 10:17–18……17 “Therefore My Father loves Me, because I lay down My life that I may take it again. 18 No one takes it from Me, but I lay it down of Myself. I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it again. This command I have received from My Father.”   (premise 2)

Therefore, Jesus is God. (conclusion)

Jesus as God speaks only truth. (premise (1)

Jesus says people are saved only through Him. (premise (2)

Therefore, Jesus is the only Savior. (conclusion)

Notice the progression of this logical argument. It forms an apologetic method for proving all Christian truth-claims.

First, we demonstrate the reliability and truthfulness of Scripture, thus establishing the Bible’s authority as God’s Word.

Second, we demonstrate that the Bible clearly teaches that Jesus Christ is God. This is proven (among other ways) by His resurrection from the dead.

Third, since Jesus is God, He speaks the words of God. Although Jesus says many things vital to the human race, the most important thing He says is that salvation is only through Him (John 14:6; Acts 4:12).

What needs to be seen is that the last two syllogisms are true only if the first syllogism is true. And the first syllogism is true only if the Bible is true. Thus, the foundational task of apologetics is to prove the reliability and authenticity of the Bible.

This method moves step by step from an initial presupposition (which we prove evidentially: The Bible is divine revelation, infallible, and authoritative) to an inescapable conclusion: Jesus Christ is Lord and Savior.

Although Montgomery, Geisler, and Sproul are dealing with somewhat different apologetic issues, you can see the similarities in their approaches. All three systems contain two essential ingredients.

First, they all employ logical argumentation to reach an inescapable conclusion. Second, all three base their systems of apologetics on the reliability and authenticity of Scripture. They recognize that a successful apologetic system depends on the authority of the Bible as God’s Word.

In terms of logical consistency, notice that all three apologists are careful to avoid begging the question (i.e., that the conclusion is valid because the premises assume it in advance). In other words, their arguments don’t move back and forth from Jesus verifying the Bible to the Bible verifying Jesus—circular reasoning. Instead, each argument claims that the Bible is a historically reliable, trustworthy document. Implicit in this claim is the existence of compelling, objective, non-biblical evidences. The premises are not merely assumed; they can be proven. This is not circular reasoning.

Before moving on, I want to point out that the apologetics issues you encounter will not always focus on the reliability of the Bible. Unbelievers harbor numerous concerns, obstacles to faith. It may be they believe that evolution destroys Christianity because it supposedly refutes the existence of God. They may practice another religious belief. Perhaps they are struggling with a philosophical issue such as the so-called “problem of evil.” Or perhaps it’s a theological issue such as the eternal destiny of the heathen.

These matters may cause an unbeliever to reject the Bible outright and refuse to examine evidence for its truthfulness and reliability. If so, we will have to provide other evidences that they will accept. For example, an evolutionist will likely need to see scientific evidence supporting creation rather than evidence supporting the Bible, even though the Bible teaches creation. Nevertheless, since the Christian position in all matters rests firmly on the authority of God’s Word, most apologetic issues will eventually lead to a discussion of the authenticity of the Bible.

When this happens, our evangelism should begin to move away from apologetics and toward law and gospel. In other words, once we have established the authority of Scripture by proving its reliability and truthfulness, we confront the unbeliever with the gospel—and the consequences of rejecting it (law). The authority of Scripture is not only the fundamental issue of apologetics, it’s also the premier point of contact leading to a gospel presentation.

One final thought. I’m not saying that we can trust the Bible only to the degree that we can prove it’s true. That’s not my point. Christians are justified in accepting the truth and authority of the Bible on its own merits. The Bible stands alone.

But we must understand that unbelievers do not have the witness of the indwelling Holy Spirit. According to 1 Corinthians 2:14, the unsaved person is not able to understand spiritual things. (This is another reason we need to be kind and easy going in our mannerisms)

  1. Offensive Apologetics

How do we do this? As Proverbs 18:17 instructs, we ask questions. First, we listen carefully to an unbeliever’s opinion on a particular issue. In doing so, we identify inaccurate data, inconsistencies, and, especially, hidden assumptions. Then we ask for a response to these errors by questioning them. This places the burden of proof over disagreements on the unbeliever; it forces him to explain what he believes, why he believes it, and to justify it. Let me illustrate this.

I once had a discussion with a non-Christian friend who claimed that God is a vengeful deity and that the Bible is one of the “bloodiest” books ever written. He based this view on God’s instructions to the Israelites in the Old Testament to kill every man, woman, child, and animal in the Canaanite nations they entered to possess (see, for example, Josh. 6:21).

Using offensive apologetics, I responded by identifying the unbeliever’s hidden assumptions and questioning them. For example, my friend assumed that God destroyed the Canaanite nations without just cause. He assumed that the nations were not worthy of such treatment. He assumed that God’s judgment was too harsh. He assumed that the Canaanite children were innocent and did not deserve such treatment.

After I identified these hidden assumptions, I then challenged them by asking pertinent questions, such as:

“Why do you think God was unfair?” (Obviously my friend didn’t know that God had given the Canaanites centuries to repent—see Genesis 15:16 and Revelation 2:18–23.)

“What do you know about these people that makes you believe they didn’t deserve such harsh treatment?” (He didn’t realize how utterly depraved, detestable, and rebellious the Canaanites were—see Deuteronomy 9:4–5 and 18:9–12.)

“What makes you think that the children were treated unfairly?” (Did he realize that children learn their ethical behavior from their parents and culture? It’s almost certain that the Canaanite children would grow up as wicked and perverted as their elders and deserve judgment every bit as much.

When unbelievers fail to account for their erroneous assumptions or indicate they haven’t considered our questions before and aren’t prepared to respond, the door is open to give the Christian perspective on the subject at hand

Do you see how this works? It’s a shift in our tactics from defense to offense. It’s approaching a religious discussion from a position that is adversarial rather than defensive. Once this technique becomes part of your arsenal, once it becomes a natural response, you’ll automatically ask challenging questions as part of your strategy of apologetics. REMEMBER we always need to ask these questions in a very kind manner as if you are treating a very fragile situation.

Read this article, study this article and put this article to good use. It is God’s will that all Christians take the word to un-believers by educating them and letting them hear and by giving them literature to read. In other words convey to the world the message of the New Testament of Jesus Christ, about Jesus Christ and for Jesus Christ.

        Always keep Jesus in your heart and on your mind.

God is testing us every day and has given us the right to make our own choices. Do you know which ones are the right choices in Gods mind?

  Fear God, love God, honor God, and trust God with all your heart, mind and soul and you will receive and experience the joy of the promises of God’s blessings in His time.

Prayer:   Father in heaven, I praise You for Your Son and the Holy Spirit. I praise You for Your grace in sending us Your wisdom about “Using Apologetics.”  Please bless apologist Dan Story for his remarkable efforts for Christianity. Please bless all those who have read this article for they too are seeking Your truth and understanding.

May God, Jesus, the Hoy Spirit and Christianity be our guiding lights for eternity.

I pray in Jesus sweet name and to His glory through the power of the Holy Spirit,

Amen.

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